#AAASmtg Day 3 & 4: it’s about the (night) sessions

Besides following the jam-packed conference itinerary, the evening activities were on my #AAAS13 radar from the beginning. That was where I got to connect with other journalists, take in the city a bit more, and just have fun.

On the evening of Day Three, science writers gathered at Fenway Park for the Kavli Science Journalism Awards.

A snow-covered Fenway

A snow-covered Fenway

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#AAASmtg Day 2: My inner agronomist + writing tips

Walking back into the Hynes Convention Center this morning, I felt prepared. I used the conference app to arrange my schedule for the day, I knew where to get free coffee, and I was wearing my most comfortable slacks. What I didn’t know was that career aspirations I had cultivated while studying agronomy at Iowa State University would come rushing back as Paul Ehrlich laid out his thoughts about the collapse our civilization. Yes, that is exactly what he did.

Thus, I spent my second day at AAAS swirling between science writers’ events and the global food security conversation at the meeting. I’ll spare you from the so-far-solutionless demise of the human race as articulated by Ehrlich and instead post a digest of advice from some of the best science journalists in the country. Below are highlights of luncheon panel discussion, including contributions by the likes of Carl Zimmer and Mariette DiChristina.

SCIENCE WRITING LUNCHEON:

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Advice from the winners: Continue reading

#AAASmtg Day 1: This thing is huge.

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View from the 3rd floor of Hynes Convention Center in Boston

This is my first time going to THE science meeting. The American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, this year in Boston. I am blogging about each day of the conference from the first timer science journalist perspective.

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Ballroom A, place of action on the first afternoon

As soon as I got off the plane, I dropped my luggage and walk over to the Hynes Convention Center. I grabbed lunch on the way and only ate half so that I could hurry up and get to….what might be the most overwhelming gathering space ever built. The vaulted ceilings. The extra wide hallways. The huge, empty exhibition halls you pass to get to the very full ballrooms.

In the ongoing  session when I showed up, New York Times’ Erik Olsen (@olsentropy)  and others were speaking about how and why to make science more visual.

All I could think about, however, was how this was soooo not ScienceOnline Continue reading